A blog devoted to miscellaneous and wacky tid bits of history! The blog is currently being overhauled so keep checking in for updates!

HELP ELI GET SURGERY

elijahelegia:

Hello erryone

As of right now I’m still roughly $900 out of being able to afford top surgery.

Employment for this summer is kind of uncertain, and even if I do get a job, it likely won’t pay very much. I’m hoping to get surgery at least by this winter, as binding is beginning to cause me a lot…

Please help our friend!

mortallyfoolish:

First Kisses Toronto

We did our own recreation. A bit late, but still great.

Without any effort on our part it turned out as diverse as Toronto itself.

Unrelated but one of our mods created this!

(Source: wildborscht)

madhistory:

Mary Little, Later Lady Carr
Thomas Gainsborough
ca. 1763
Yale Center for British Art

If interested, I have started a new interior decorating blog which features photos of period interiors and more contemporary interiors eclectic in their style. The above Gainsborough work (one of my favorites!) is the blog’s header image.

Follow Parlors and Pantries here.

Happy holidays!

-jamesthepious

(via madhistory)

Film Reviews by Cotton Mather

conversation w a history major

H:

have you heard of Keumalahayati

H:

you'd love her

me:

nooo

me:

i google

H:

she was the first female admiral

H:

indonesian

H:

single-handedly fought off the dutch

H:

her navy was made of WIDOWS

me:

IM IN LOVE

me:

omg

H:

WIDOWS GODDAMNIT

paintedfire:

DON’T USE FLASH PHOTOGRAPHY IN A MUSEUM OR GALLERY.

Preach!

paintedfire:

DON’T USE FLASH PHOTOGRAPHY IN A MUSEUM OR GALLERY.

Preach!

Black History Month: Canada Had Slavery?

Canada’s slave-owning history is being ignored, says expert, as Black History Month kicks off.

‘Author and historian Afua Cooper has described slavery in the Great White North as “Canada’s best kept secret.” She says that between 1628 and 1833, Canada had approximately 8,000 slaves, but it’s a part of the country’s history that is not well known.

“Canada conveniently forgot its own history of slave-holding, because that would make the country look immoral, indecent,” says Cooper […]

Before the British conquest of 1760 when Canada was still a French colony, nearly 60 percent of slaves were aboriginal and 40 percent were of African descent, Cooper estimates. After Britain took over, the ratio of aboriginal slaves declined as the British brought in more slaves from Africa, the West Indies, and the Caribbean, as well as from its 13 American colonies. 

Slave-owners in the American South were largely plantation owners, but in Canada they ran the gamut, from merchants and fur traders to farmers and even religious institutions.

“The slave owners were everybody, in every social class,” says Cooper. “Members of the clergy owned large amounts of slaves.”’

-fycanadianpolitics

(via sadgaymeme)

We’ve started amassing some posts for the establishment of a queue!

If you like to expedite the process, feel free to submit posts!

Thanks,

The mods

magictransistor:

(Unknown). Chakrasamvara and Vajravarahi. 1570s.
This powerful depiction of the twelve-armed Chakrasamvara embracing his consort Vajravarahi depicts a highly charged vision by an advanced tantric master. Potent color dynamics add tension to the picture. The blue figure of Chakrasamvara has additional heads in yellow, green, and red (symbolizing the colors of the Jina “Victor” Buddhas). With his raised hands he holds the skin of an elephant. The next pair of hands holds a flaying knife and skull cup, while the third pair holds an elephant goad and a vajra-tipped noose. The fourth pair holds the double-sided drum (damaru) and the four-faced severed head of Brahma. In the fifth pair he holds a trident and a khatvanga ritual staff. With his principal hands he grasps Vajravarahi and holds the bell and vajra. He wears a garland of freshly severed heads over his shoulders.
This is one of few Nepalese paintings to evoke so completely the energy of physical union as an expression of knowledge and method coming together to achieve enlightenment. Chakrasamvara is associated with both Heruka and Hevajra, and his iconography closely resembles that of Shiva (both have three eyes and hold a skull cup, trident, and elephant skin). Such concordance of Buddhist and Hindu iconography is not unusual and has its origins in tantrism of medieval eastern India. Here, Chakrasamvara and Vajravarahi together trample a blue Bhairava and a red Kalartri, showing their dominance over these Hindu gods. -Met 

magictransistor:

(Unknown). Chakrasamvara and Vajravarahi. 1570s.

This powerful depiction of the twelve-armed Chakrasamvara embracing his consort Vajravarahi depicts a highly charged vision by an advanced tantric master. Potent color dynamics add tension to the picture. The blue figure of Chakrasamvara has additional heads in yellow, green, and red (symbolizing the colors of the Jina “Victor” Buddhas). With his raised hands he holds the skin of an elephant. The next pair of hands holds a flaying knife and skull cup, while the third pair holds an elephant goad and a vajra-tipped noose. The fourth pair holds the double-sided drum (damaru) and the four-faced severed head of Brahma. In the fifth pair he holds a trident and a khatvanga ritual staff. With his principal hands he grasps Vajravarahi and holds the bell and vajra. He wears a garland of freshly severed heads over his shoulders.

This is one of few Nepalese paintings to evoke so completely the energy of physical union as an expression of knowledge and method coming together to achieve enlightenment. Chakrasamvara is associated with both Heruka and Hevajra, and his iconography closely resembles that of Shiva (both have three eyes and hold a skull cup, trident, and elephant skin). Such concordance of Buddhist and Hindu iconography is not unusual and has its origins in tantrism of medieval eastern India. Here, Chakrasamvara and Vajravarahi together trample a blue Bhairava and a red Kalartri, showing their dominance over these Hindu gods. -Met